Risk Management Program

On August 30, 2017 the D.C. Circuit denied environmental and labor groups’ request to stay the Tump EPA’s final rule delaying the Obama-era amendments to the EPA’s Risk Management Program (“RMP”) rule. The RMP rule implements Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act and requires facilities that use extremely hazardous substances to develop and update

EPA

On June, 9, 2017, Scott Pruitt signed a final rule  delaying the effective date of the RMP rule until February 19, 2019. The Environmental Protection Agency” (“EPA”) stated that it had received 54,117 public comments, 54,000 of which were part of a mass mail campaign, leaving 108 submissions with unique content. A final rule is

The United States Environmental Protection Agency in Washington DC. (Photo by: Loop Images/UIG via Getty Images)

On March 14, 2016, Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) proposed changes to the RMP Rule . On December 21, 2016, the EPA disclosed its changes via a Pre-Publication Copy.

In the proposed rule, the EPA essentially agreed that the scope and trigger for post incident investigation was not universally understood or applied. The final rule

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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) published a Request for Information (“RFI”) on December 9, 2013 concerning possible changes to the Process Safety Management (“PSM”) program codified at 29 C.F.R. 1910.119. See 78 Fed. Reg. 73756 (Dec. 9, 2013). Likewise, the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) published an RFI on July 31, 2014 relating

pumps and piping system inside of industrial plant at night

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) published a Request for Information (“RFI”)  on December 9, 2013 concerning possible changes to the Process Safety Management (“PSM”) program codified at 29 C.F.R. 1910.119.  See 78 Fed. Reg. 73756 (Dec. 9, 2013).  Likewise, the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) published an RFI on July 31, 2014 relating

storage_tank_1

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) published a Request for Information (“RFI”)  on December 9, 2013 concerning possible changes to the Process Safety Management (“PSM”) program codified at 29 C.F.R. 1910.119.  See 78 Fed. Reg. 73756 (Dec. 9, 2013).  Likewise, the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) published an RFI on July 31, 2014 relating

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Both OSHA’s Process Safety Management (“PSM”) and EPA’s Chemical Accident Prevention regulations are regulatory programs developed to address process safety in the “Process Industry.” A “Process” is defined broadly and includes any activity that uses, stores, manufactures, handles or moves hazardous chemicals. Since the definition is broad, it includes much more than refineries and chemical

There is only one level of PSM applicability; either you are in or out. Processes are subject to PSM if they contain the threshold amount of a Chemical found in Appendix A to the rule, or if it has more than 10,000 pounds of a flammable gas or liquid. See 29 CFR 1910.119(a). PSM applicability